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Batteries

Battery Recycling And Disposal

Whether used or unused, batteries become waste on the date on which they are discarded. Different batteries have different management requirements when they become wastes. Certain batteries are unregulated as wastes, while others are regulated. Please review the information below to learn more about how some of the common batteries generated at Shepherd are managed.

Unregulated Waste Batteries

Alkaline Batteries

Carbon-Zinc Batteries

Universal Waste Batteries

Regulated batteries include batteries that exhibit one or more of the four characteristics of a hazardous waste as identified in the federal hazardous waste regulations. For instance, a nickel-cadmium battery is regulated because it meets the toxicity characteristic of a hazardous waste due its cadmium content. Additionally, it may meet the reactivity characteristic of a hazardous waste. Although these batteries are considered hazardous wastes, these batteries are eligible to be managed under the less stringent Universal Waste rule. The Universal Waste rule was developed for certain hazardous wastes that are commonly generated (i.e. batteries, lamps, mercury-containing equipment and pesticides) by regulated establishments, such as Shepherd University.  The universal waste regulations promote collection and recycling of these common hazardous wastes and ease the regulatory burden on the regulated generators of these wastes. For the most part, universal waste batteries include rechargeable batteries and certain button cell batteries.  It should be noted that lead-acid batteries meet the Universal Waste definition, but are exempt from universal waste regulations if they are managed under the requirements of 40 CFR part 266 subpart G. Please review the list of common regulated battery types generated at Shepherd below to learn how the batteries are managed.

Lead-Acid Batteries

Lead-acid batteries can be managed as a Universal Waste, but are exempt from the Hazardous Waste and Universal Waste requirements if they are managed under the requirements of 40 CFR part 266 subpart G. See the “Exempted Lead Acid Batteries” section below for more information on how lead-acid batteries are managed at Shepherd University.

Lithium Batteries

Lithium batteries are a regulated hazardous waste under EPA and WV DEP regulations. These batteries are eligible to be managed as Universal Waste under EPA and WV DEP hazardous waste regulations. At Shepherd, lithium batteries are managed as Universal Wastes.

Nickel-Cadmium Batteries (Ni-Cd)

Nickel-cadmium batteries are a regulated hazardous waste under EPA and WV DEP regulations. These are to be managed as Universal Waste under EPA and WV DEP hazardous waste regulations. At Shepherd, Nickel-cadmium batteries are managed as Universal Wastes.

Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries (Ni-MH)

Nickel metal hydride batteries are a regulated hazardous waste under EPA and WV DEP regulations. These batteries are to be managed as Universal Waste under EPA and WV DEP hazardous waste regulations. At Shepherd, Nickel metal hydride batteries are managed as Universal Wastes.

Mercuric-Oxide Batteries

Mercuric-oxide button cell batteries are a regulated hazardous waste under EPA and WV DEP regulations. These batteries are to be managed as Universal Waste under EPA and WV DEP hazardous waste regulations. At Shepherd, Mercuric-Oxide batteries are managed as Universal Wastes.

Silver-Oxide Batteries

Silver-oxide button cell batteries are regulated hazardous waste under EPA and WV DEP regulations. These batteries are to be managed as Universal Waste under EPA and WV DEP hazardous waste regulations. At Shepherd, Silver-oxide batteries are managed as Universal Wastes.

Exempted Lead-acid Batteries

Lead-acid Batteries Managed Under 40 CFR 266 Subpart G

Lead-acid batteries can be managed as a Universal Waste, but are exempt from the Hazardous Waste and Universal Waste requirements if they are managed under the requirements of 40 CFR part 266 subpart G. Using this exemption even further lessens the management requirements on Shepherd.  At Shepherd, lead-acid batteries from cars, tractors and mowers, emergency lighting and Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS) for computers and other electronics are collected and sent for reclamation using this exemption. The lead-acid batteries generated at Shepherd are ultimately shipped to East Penn Manufacturing for recycling/reclamation.  Follow this link to East Penn’s website for more information on their recycling process:  http://www.eastpennmanufacturing.com/about/sustainability/.  Contact Dustin Robbins, Campus Environmental Safety Coordinator, if you have generated a lead-acid battery to be managed.

DO NOT BRING PERSONAL/HOUSEHOLD BATTERIES TO CAMPUS FOR RECYCLING! The recycling program at Shepherd is for batteries generated on campus only. Due to budget constraints, the University cannot provide for the recycling of personal and household batteries. Drop off locations for rechargeable batteries are offered at many retail locations (e.g. Lowe’s, Home Depot, Best Buy) as well as through community recycling programs.