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Honors Courses

The following Honors Courses are scheduled for the Fall 2021 semester:

The Honors First Year Core

(3 cr. each; 6 cr. total) The Honors Core is required for all first-year Honors students. The Core is comprised of two, three credit hour courses in History and Literature that are intended to provide Honors students with an academic environment in which they can experience education in a dynamic interactive way. Each section of this learning community pairs an Honors History of Civilization course with an Honors Literature and Culture course of the same period. For Fall 2020, students can opt for the pair of courses that deals with world history and literature of the Atlantic world from approximately 1600 to the present (Sections 01) or the pair that deals with the same topics in the Medieval world (Sections 02). Core code for HNRS 205: GL, HM

(30624) HNRS 102, Section 01 – Honors History of Civilization
Offered: TR 9:35-10:50 a.m.
Instructor: Dr. Julia Sandy

(30700) HNRS 205, Section 01 – Honors Literature and Culture
Offered: MWF 10:10-11:00 a.m.
Instructor: Dr. Mark Cantrell

OR

(30722) HNRS 102, Section 02 – Honors History of Civilization
Offered: TR 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Instructor: Dr. Sally Brasher

(30701) HNRS 205, Section 02 – Honors Literature and Culture
Offered: TR 3:15-4:40 p.m.
Instructor: Dr. Betty Ellzey

Other Core Curriculum Courses

(31500) FINC 250H, Section 01 – Financial Literacy and Well Being Honors
(3 cr.) This course will equip students with fundamental concepts of financial education and planning. Students will be able to apply their understanding of financial concepts in their relevant life situations to provide for lifelong healthy financial decision-making and well being. Core codes: WE
Offered: MW 12:10-1:25 p.m.
Instructor: Dr. Michael Lynch

Honors Capstone Project Courses

(30414) HNR 388, Section 01 – Honors Project Preparation
(1 cr.) This course prepares Honors candidates to undertake the work of the Honors Capstone Project, the final requirement for graduation from the Honors Program. Topics include an overview of the research process, the differences between theses and non-thesis projects, developing appropriate research questions, identifying an appropriate faculty mentor, techniques for overcoming common stumbling blocks in conducting research, and information on the expectations of the Honors Directed Readings and Honors Capstone Project courses. This course will culminate in the production of a final research proposal. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Offered: TBA (no regular meeting time for the course as a whole; students arrange individual meetings with the instructor)
Instructor: Dr. Mark Cantrell

(30181) HNRS 488, Section 01 – Honors Directed Readings
(3 cr.) In this course, honors students begin research toward a major thesis to be completed as a graduation requirement. Each student will choose a mentor from the faculty. In collaboration with the faculty mentor, the student will develop an original idea about the chosen topic and will formulate a reading list that will contribute to a thesis proposal. The thesis proposal, which is the final product of this class, should be a plan for a substantial piece of work in the student’s chosen field and should contribute substantially to the student’s professional development.
Offered: TBA (no regular meeting time for the course as a whole; students arrange individual meetings with the instructor and their faculty mentors)
Instructor: Dr. Mark Cantrell

(30182) HNRS 489, Section 01 – Honors Capstone Project
(1-3 cr.) After completing a revised proposal in the Directed Readings course, a candidate in honors shall work with a faculty mentor to complete the Honors Capstone Project, the final requirement for graduation from the Honors Program. The project topic should be chosen within the candidate’s major or minor field of study, usually adapting a student’s major capstone project for additional Honors credit. In many cases, the Honors Capstone Project will take the form of a thesis and include a carefully prepared argument in support of the thesis statement. Rather than a thesis, students in certain fields of study (e.g., graphic design) may choose to design a capstone project. Such a project must also include an initial proposal that will support the design of that project. The thesis or project shall culminate in a formal presentation to an audience consisting of faculty, students, friends, and family. This course may be repeated, to a maximum of 3 earned credits. Prerequisite: HNRS 488.
Offered: TBA (no regular meeting time for the course as a whole; students arrange individual meetings with the instructor and their faculty mentors)
Instructor: Dr. Mark Cantrell

Sampler of Honors Courses