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Standard 1 Links:

Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates

Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates

Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates

Student Learning for Teacher Candidates

Knowledge and Skills for Other School Professionals

Student Learning for Other School Professionals

Professional Dispositions for All Candidates


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STANDARD 1: CANDIDATE KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND PROFESSIONAL DISPOSITIONS
Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other school professionals know and demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

1A. Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates

Directions When Programs Have Been Reviewed Nationally or by a Similar State Review

To reduce burden and duplication, units have fewer reporting requirements for Standard1, when programs have been submitted for national review or similar state review. These review processes cover many of the elements in Standard 1. For programs that have been submitted for national review or similar state review, units are asked to report in the IR only the following information:

* State licensing test data for Element 1a (content knowledge for teacher candidates) and
Element 1e (knowledge and skills for other school professionals)
* Assessment Data for Element 1c (professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills)
* Assessment data for Element 1g (dispositions)
* Results of follow-up studies of graduates and employers (all standards elements)

Because program standards do not generally cover general professional knowledge and skills nor professional dispositions, the unit must respond to all of the prompts in Elements 1c (Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates) and 1g (Professional Dispositions for All Candidates) regardless of whether programs have been submitted for national or state review.

The prompts for each element in the IR include reminders of when data for these programs need not be included. The term "similar state review" refers to state review processes that require institutions to submit assessments and assessment data for evaluation and/or approval. For more information on "similar state review," click on the HELP button at the top right corner of your screen.

1a. Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]

1a.1. What are the pass rates of teacher candidates in initial teacher preparation programs on state tests of content knowledge for each program and across all programs (i.e., overall pass rate)? Please complete Table 4 or upload your own table at Prompt 1a.5 below. [This information could be compiled from Title II data submitted to the state or from program reports prepared for national review.]

Table 4

PEU Table Four
* Low Enrollment Programs

1a.2 (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from other key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs demonstrate the content knowledge delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below.]

The West Virginia Department of Education has reviewed all licensure programs. National specialty organizations, as discussed in the Overview section of this report, have reviewed most licensure programs. Please refer to content SPA or CAR reports for further information.

1a.3. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the content knowledge delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below.]

The MACI program is not designed to prepare candidates for initial or advanced licensure/ certification in any area. The MACI is a graduate program primarily for licensed practicing teachers; therefore, MACI candidates enter the program with in-depth content knowledge in their specialty areas. There are two distinct paths for entry into the MACI program, the traditional program for licensed teachers, and a new path for non-teaching professionals in education. The PEUC and the Graduate Council modified the admissions criteria for the MACI program in the spring of 2010 to permit the admission of non-teaching professionals in education. Non-teaching professionals are not included in current data, as non-certified candidates will begin the program in the fall semester of 2010 (Attachment L).

Candidates in the MACI program must pass evaluations on key assessments for entry into EDUC 580: Action Research Thesis. These key assessments include an overall grade point average of 2.75, grades of C or better in each graduate education course, the Assessment Portfolio in EDUC 504, and the Diversity Assessment Project in EDUC 523. Successful completion of EDUC 580: Action Research Thesis Experience, consisting of a positive course grade and thesis, qualifies the candidate for graduation as a program completer in the MACI program.

One major revision made to the MACI last year was the addition of comprehensive exams. Candidates who entered the MACI program in January 2009 and after are required to pass these exams for admission to EDUC 580. The comprehensive exams will include a question that addresses the candidate's mastery of content knowledge. Faculty with expertise in that content area will review responses to this question. No candidate has taken the comprehensive exam to date, as candidates who have entered after January 2009 have not yet progressed to that point in the program.

The survey of graduating candidates, administered during the last course that students complete in the program, assesses candidates' content knowledge. The first administration of this survey was at the conclusion of the spring 2009 semester, and the second administration at the conclusion of the spring 2010 semester. Spring 2010 data results indicate that program completers believe that the program broadened the depth and breadth of their content knowledge. The majority of comments included statements regarding the strength of the core education courses and the abilities of the professors who taught them. Spring 2009 data results reflected the opinions of candidates in 2010; however, they indicated that scheduling and rotation of content courses were challenging.

NASM accredited the Master of Music in Music Education program. The NASM accreditation process addresses the documentation of content knowledge.

1a.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation in the content area? If survey data are being reported, what was the response rate? [A table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to content knowledge could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below. The attached table could include all of the responses to your follow-up survey to which you could refer the reader in responses on follow-up studies in other elements of Standard 1.]

The PEU developed four surveys for initial licensure (undergraduate and MAT) and three surveys for the MACI. Graduating candidates are asked to rate their perceptions of their preparation in relation to various candidate proficiencies. Recent graduates (who completed a program within last five years), assessed their perceptions of their preparation after having the opportunity to apply the knowledge attained in the teacher education program. Public school principals report their perceptions of candidates' preparation, and cooperating teachers provide perceptions of initial licensure candidates' preparation and university support. The initial administration of the cooperating teacher survey occurred at the conclusion of the spring 2010 semester.

The survey for graduating candidates in initial licensure programs (undergraduate and MAT) was administered for the first time in the fall semester of 2008, yielding a response rate of 94.8%. The surveys for spring 2009, fall 2009, and spring 2010 yielded a response rate of 100%; surveys were administered during an EDUC 400 session. When asked to rate the program in relation to obtaining sufficient content knowledge in their discipline (Part 1, questions 1), 89% of candidates rated the program as either "Exceptional" or "Strong". Over 90% of respondents in 2009 and 2010 indicated "Exceptional" or "Strong" for obtaining sufficient content knowledge in their discipline. Cooperating teachers reported that candidates were well prepared in the areas of content knowledge, lesson planning, and instructional strategies.

The principals' survey for initial licensure and the MACI programs have indicators that address content preparation; however, the response rate was too low to formulate conclusions. Methods for increased response rate are being explored. Alumni reported feeling well prepared in content knowledge and pedagogy.

1a.5 (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the content knowledge of teacher candidates may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.] Exhibits for 1a:
* Documentation from NASM for Accreditation of Music Programs
* Attachment A: Directions for accessing SPA reports through PRS
* Attachment K: PRAXIS II Content Exam Results for Each Program Disaggregated by Year
* Attachment K1: List of required PRAXIS II by License and by Year
* Attachment L: MACI Report
* Attachment M: Survey of Graduating Candidates (Initial Licensure) with Data
* Attachment N: Survey of Alumni
* Attachment O: Survey of Principals Evaluating Recent Graduates
* Attachment P: Survey of Cooperating Teachers
* Title II Reports

1B. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates

1b.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs demonstrate the pedagogical content knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.]

The West Virginia Department of Education has reviewed all licensure programs. National specialty organizations, as discussed in the Overview section of this report, have reviewed most licensure programs. Please refer to content accreditation reports for additional information.

Candidates who complete initial teacher preparation programs as either as an undergraduate or in the MAT program (See MAT Handbook) must pass PRAXIS PLT and content knowledge exams, create a unit of lessons and evaluate student performance, have a successful student teaching experience, possess an undergraduate degree and be of appropriate character as described by WVDE Policy 5100. Data from these assessments are in the attachments reporting PLT, unit plan, TWS, and ST76 reporting results.

1b.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates know and apply theories related to pedagogy and learning, are able to use a range of instructional strategies and technologies, and can explain the choices they make in their practice. [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.]

The survey of graduating MACI candidates assesses content knowledge and the application of content knowledge. The first two administrations of the survey were at the conclusion of the spring 2009 and spring 2010 semesters. Spring 2009 results indicate that graduates were highly satisfied with the core education courses in the MACI program (Part I), with the majority of survey items receiving a ranking of "Exceptional," "Strong," or "Sufficient." Candidates also ranked, "Able to apply theoretical knowledge" as "Exceptional," "Strong," or "Sufficient." Only items related to education course availability received a rating of "Weak" by more than 25% of respondents. Recent efforts to increase course availability should remedy this in the future. Respondents were less satisfied with their content strand courses (Part II), particularly as related to course availability (41.7% "Weak"); however, at least 75% of respondents listed the remaining items as "Exceptional," "Strong," or "Sufficient." Spring 2010 results indicate that graduates were highly satisfied with the core education courses in the MACI program (Part I), with the majority of survey items receiving a ranking of "Exceptional," "Strong," or "Sufficient." Unlike the Spring 2009 survey, respondents now indicate satisfaction with availability of core education courses, indicating that changes made to scheduling are having a positive effect. Only "Preparation to use community or family resources to meet the needs of diverse learners" received a rating of weak (50%). Perceived strengths of the program (majority ratings of "Exceptional") were as follows: 1. learning new pedagogical strategies to help me improve my practice, 15. improving my writing and research skills,14. developing my professional/affective knowledge as a teacher, 13. Improving my ability to think critically about my role as a teacher, 19. Quality of teaching in professional education courses. Respondents were less satisfied with their content strand courses (Part II), particularly as related to course availability (75% "Weak"); however, 75% of respondents listed the following items as either "Exceptional" or "Strong": 1. extending the depth of my content knowledge in my discipline, 2. extending the breadth of my content knowledge in my discipline, 8. meeting my expectations for workload in graduate study. Open-ended comments included further indication of graduate students' dissatisfaction with availability of content courses. Given the small size of MACI program, it is fiscally prohibitive to offer all courses each semester. Courses are offered on a two-year rotation; however, a science cohort began in the fall semester of 2009. There are plans for a math cohort in the future.

The NASM accredited the Master of Music in Music Education program. The NASM accreditation report addresses the documentation of content knowledge (Campus Workroom).

1b.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation in pedagogical content knowledge and skills? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to pedagogical content knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.]

The survey for graduating candidates in initial licensure programs (undergraduate and MAT), administered for the first time in the fall semester of 2008, and yielded a response rate of 94.8%. The survey response rate for spring 2009 was 97%, and spring 2010 was 100% as candidates completed the surveys on Tk20 independently or in class. When asked to rate the program in relation to obtaining pedagogical content knowledge (Part 1, question 2), 91.9% of candidates rated the program as either "Exceptional" or "Strong" in this area. The alumni and principals' surveys for initial licensure programs have indicators that address pedagogical content knowledge and skills. The principals' survey for initial licensure and the MACI programs have indicators that address content preparation; however, the response rate was too low to formulate conclusions. Methods for increased response rate are being explored. Alumni reported feeling well prepared in content knowledge and pedagogy.

All three surveys developed for the MACI program include indicators that address pedagogical content knowledge and performance skills. The survey of graduating candidates (See Attachment J) in the MACI program was administered in EDUC 580. There was a 100% response rate for all MACI candidates. In 2008-2009 and 2009-2010, graduates were highly satisfied with the core education courses in the MACI program, with the majority of survey items receiving a ranking of Exceptional, Strong, or Sufficient.

Results from the survey of cooperating teachers, administered for the first time at the conclusion of the spring semester of 2010, indicated that cooperating teachers believe that candidates are well prepared in terms of content knowledge, lesson planning, and variety of instructional strategies.

1b.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the pedagogical content knowledge of teacher candidates may be attached here. (Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.)

Exhibits for 1b:
* Documentation from NASM for Accreditation of Music Programs
* Attachment A: Directions for Accessing SPA reports through PRS
* Attachment K: Survey of Graduating Candidates (Initial Licensure)
* Attachment L: MACI Report
* Attachment M: Survey of Graduating Candidates in MACI
* Attachment N:Survey of Alumni (Initial and Advanced Licensure)
* Attachment O: Survey of Principals Evaluating Recent graduates (Initial licensure)
* Attachment P: Survey of Cooperating Teachers

1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]

1c.1. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation and advanced teacher preparation programs demonstrate the professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards to facilitate learning? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.]

Initial Licensure Programs
Multiple unit assessments including: PRAXIS II PLT and content exams, Student Teaching Evaluations (ST76), the Methods Course Unit Plan, and the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) evaluate candidates' professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills for initial licensure. The PRAXIS II PLT exams include three sections that address professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills (Sections II, V, and VI). The overall unit pass rate for PRAXIS II exams for the last 3 years is 92%. Student teaching evaluation data collection includes data from university supervisors, P-12 mentor teachers, and beginning in the fall semester of 2008, candidates complete a self-evaluation. Beginning in the fall semester of 2008, P-12 mentor teachers began using the same form used by university supervisors, the ST-76, to facilitate data comparison. P-12 mentor teachers complete the Professional Education Performance Evaluation, (PEPE- ST58), a WVDE licensure requirement. The ST-76 includes indicators that address professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills. The PEU expects candidates to perform at the Development level or higher by the end of clinical experience. University supervisors conduct a minimum of five observations of candidates' teaching. Since the fall semester of 2008, university supervisors complete one summative evaluation at the end of the semester for elementary candidates and at the end of seven week visit when a minimum of two observations have occurred. To strengthen inter-rater reliability, the teacher education program developed a manual to accompany the ST76 instrument that includes descriptors for each rating on each indicator.

Candidates develop a unit of instruction specific to their discipline during the methods course that the candidates complete the semester prior to clinical practice. Each specialization area creates its own unit plan guidelines and scoring guide that address SPA-specific standards. Data results from the unit plan assignments are in the SPA/CAR reports. Candidates complete the TWS during student teaching and address proficiencies in relation to planning for all learners and using assessment data to support student learning. TWS data are part of the data reported for each program's SPA/CAR report.

The MACI and MME Programs
Several assessments evaluate professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills for MACI candidates (Attachment L). These include the Diversity Field Project, comprehensive exams (after January 2009), action research thesis, and assessment portfolio. Comprehensive exams will include a question that addresses the candidate's professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills. Faculty members with expertise in the candidate's content area will evaluate the response to this question in terms of content knowledge and DOE faculty will evaluate for pedagogical knowledge. The action research thesis is a key assessment tool since the inception of the MACI program. The DOE voted in the fall semester of 2008 to align and assess the MACI program with NBPTS. The scoring guide, aligned with NBPTS, was developed and implemented during the spring 2009 semester.

MACI candidates develop an assessment portfolio during EDUC 504: Effective Classroom Assessment to demonstrate their capacity in using assessments to support student learning. The first class collaborated and developed the rubric that assessed their portfolios. Results indicated that candidates have developed a useful meta-assessment tool and that they have achieved significant gains in using assessments to enhance learning as well as document it.

NASM accredited the Master of Music in Music Education on June 30, 2006. Documentation of professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills are addressed through that accreditation process.

1c.2. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs consider the school, family, and community contexts and the prior experiences of students; reflect on their own practice; know major schools of thought about schooling, teaching, and learning; and can analyze educational research findings? If a licensure test is required in this area, how are candidates performing on it? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.]

PEU faculty members developed specific course assignments that serve as major assessments for the unit and individual professional education courses. Candidates' philosophies of education develop over time as do their content knowledge and performance in the P-12 classroom. Candidates' understanding of contextual learning and prior learning begins during the pre-admission courses of the program. As candidates learn the conceptual framework and strands of the program in the introductory course, they learn how context not only influenced their learning, but how context affects the learning and lives of their future students. Candidates write a reflection of learning based on their experiences tutoring at Job Corps. This reflection is a key assessment of the foundations course, EDUC 200. One of the key assessments in EDUC 320 requires teacher candidates to examine the context of the school where they complete their first 30-hour field placement.

Following admission to the teacher education program, there are four major assessments that candidates complete that relate to context and prior learning of students.

One is the Unit Plan that is required of all specialization areas. Candidates must plan a unit of lessons, specific to their content areas, that considers the prior learning of the students as well as the diverse learning needs of the students in the class (See individual SPA reports for Unit Plan data.). Candidates are required to construct lesson plans specifically to address the diverse learning needs of students.

The Teacher Work Sample completed during student teaching requires candidates to consider the context of their classroom and school when developing learning goals and to base instruction upon the prior experiences and knowledge that students bring to the topic. In addition, candidates are required to reflect on what they learned from the TWS and specify plans for further professional development. The SPA/CAR reports for each specialization area report data results for this assessment. Candidates must receive a minimum of "Meets Standard" on Part I: Overview of Student Population, prior learning, and learning environment in order to complete this assessment successfully.

The Student Teaching Evaluation form (ST76) includes two indicators that address candidates' ability to reflect on their own practice: Indicator 13 "Is prepared to provide rationale(s) for teaching behaviors that are indicative of reflective problem-solving," and Indicator 15, "Actively seeks to learn from teaching experiences." Candidates received high ratings on both of these indicators from university supervisors and P-12 mentor teachers. See ST 76s, including candidates' self-evaluations, for all specialization areas.

The PRAXIS II PLT exams address the major schools of thought about schooling, teaching, and learning as well as analysis of education of educational research findings (Sections I, III, IV, and VII). The overall unit pass rate for this exam for the last 3 years is 92%. Examining sub-scores demonstrates that candidate average scores were at or above averages at the state and national level.

Candidates' abilities to plan, implement, and assess student learning based on students' contextual and prior learning is evidenced in standard-based and performance-based data. Candidates reflect on their learning from coursework and field experiences; these reflections deepen in scope and understanding as the candidates' progress through the program. See SPA reports to review specific data reporting for each unit plans, ST 76s, TWSs, and PRAXIS scores for each content area.

1c.3. What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates reflect on their practice; engage in professional activities; have a thorough understanding of the school, family, and community contexts in which they work; collaborate with the professional community; are aware of current research and policies related to schooling, teaching, learning, and best practices; and can analyze educational research and policies and explain the implications for their own practice and the profession? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.]

The MACI (Attachment L) uses four primary assessments to address this standard. The Action Research Thesis Project requires candidates to reflect on their own practice and to analyze the research of others as well as research their own practice to determine what it means in relation to their teaching and the teaching profession. A scoring guide, instituted in the spring 2009, to align with NBPTS standards, is used to evaluate candidate proficiencies in relation to this assessment. The four candidates who completed EDUC 580 at the end of the spring 2010 semester met or exceeded all NBPT Standards. Twelve candidates completed the EDUC 580 in 2009. Results indicated that all candidates met or exceeded standards on all indicators.

The Assessment Portfolio, a requirement of EDUC 504, provides indicators for sound assessment for learning as well as assessment of learning, and multiple opportunities to design and revise assessments to improve their design and utility. Students compile and self-assess portfolios that document their growth in assessment use and design over the course of the semester; these portfolios aid practitioners with future assessment design. Seven candidates have completed this project. Data results indicate that candidates understand at high levels both the use of assessments as learning aids and how to construct meaningful assessments collaboratively.

The Diversity Field Project, which candidates complete while enrolled in EDUC 523: Diversity Awareness and Collaborative Practice, requires candidates to investigate the community context of the school for which they work (or for another school) and to collaborate with other school personnel and community members to address an issue identified in the community. The EDUC 523 course was added as a core required course in the fall of 2008, and the Diversity Field Project was developed and implemented for the spring 2009 semester. Results indicate that candidates explored significant topics including ELL instruction strategies, standardized testing and cultural bias, uniforms in public schools, diversity in gifted education, and diversity in teacher recruitment.

Candidates admitted after January 2009 must pass the comprehensive exam for admission to the Action Research Thesis course. The comprehensive exam will include a question that addresses the candidate's awareness of "current research and policies related to schooling, teaching, learning and best practices." Faculty members with content area expertise will evaluate the candidate responses relative to content knowledge and DOE faculty will evaluate responses relevant to pedagogy. No candidate to date has taken the comprehensive exam.

1c.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation related to professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.]

The initial administration of the survey for graduating candidates in initial licensure programs (undergraduate and MAT) occurred in the fall semester of 2008, and included questions that address professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills. Each semester, the majority of graduating students rated their preparation in these areas as either "Exceptional" or "Strong." Candidates also rated their preparation in core education courses as exceptional or strong in the majority of all areas. The alumni and principals' surveys for initial licensure programs also have indicators that address professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills. Principals indicated that graduates are well prepared in professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills.

All three surveys developed for the advanced MACI program include indicators that address professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills. Each semester, the majority of graduating students rated their preparation in these areas as either "Exceptional" or "Strong." Candidates also rated their preparation in core education courses as exceptional or strong in the majority of all areas. The alumni and principals' surveys for initial licensure programs also have indicators that address professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills. Principals indicated that graduates are well prepared in professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills.

1c.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills of teacher candidates may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

Exhibits for 1c:
* Attachment K and Attachment K1 PRAXIS Data by Exam by Year
* Attachment L MACI Report
* Attachment M Survey of Graduating Candidates (Initial Licensure) with data
* Attachment N Survey of Alumni (Initial Licensure)
* Attachment O Survey of Principals Evaluating Recent graduates (Initial licensure)
* Attachment P Survey of Cooperating Teachers
* Attachment R Student Teaching Data (ST-76)
* Attachment S Professional Education Performance Evaluation (ST 58)
* Attachment T Student Teaching Manual (ST 76)
* Attachment U Teacher Work Sample Guidelines and Rubric and Data
* Documentation from NASM for Accreditation of Music Programs
* Title II Reports

1d. Student Learning for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]

1d.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs can assess and analyze student learning, make appropriate adjustments to instruction, monitor student learning, and develop and implement meaningful learning experiences to help all students learn? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]

Data from key assessments for initial (undergraduate and MAT) candidates including PRAXIS exams results, Units Plans created in specialty content area methods classes, Teacher Work Samples, student teaching observation reports (ST 76), and surveys, indicate that teacher candidates have had experiences analyzing student learning and adapting instruction to meet the learning needs of students. PRAXIS PLT results indicate that candidates scored above average on Sections I and IV: Students as Learners and II and V: Instruction and Assessment. Candidates develop Unit Plans Methods classes that include lessons related to standards based instruction and adaptations of those lessons that include strategies for diverse learners. Units include assessments during the lessons and at the conclusion of the unit. The Teacher Work Sample assignment requires candidates to develop a unit of instruction based on the students' prior learning and content goals of the curriculum. Candidates pre-test and post-test students following the delivery of the instruction to determine learning outcomes and to reflect on what they, as pre-service teachers, could do to improve student learning. They identify a struggling learner, accommodate instruction to meet that student's unique needs, and closely monitor that student's progress throughout the unit. Survey results indicated that candidates believe that they understand to plan, deliver, and assess instruction. Student teaching reports (ST 76s) completed by cooperating teachers further support this by indicating that the major of candidates perform at an "Integration" level on "Uses assessment techniques that include student products appropriate to the learning activity." University supervisors reported that 23.08% of candidates in student teaching performed at the "Development" level and 69.23% performed at the "Integration" level on this item during the spring 2010 semester. Therefore, 92.31% of candidates met or exceeded the standard on this item.

See Program SPA/ CAR Reports/Reviews (Attachment A) and survey data for PRAXIS, Unit Plans, TWS, and ST76 results.

1d.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates demonstrate a thorough understanding of the major concepts and theories related to assessing student learning; regularly apply them in their practice; analyze student, classroom, and school performance data; make data-driven decisions about strategies for teaching and learning; and are aware of and utilize school and community resources that support student learning? [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]

MACI candidates, as licensed teachers, assess student learning as part of their regular practice. As candidates in the MACI program, they participate in two courses, EDUC 504 and EDUC 580 that require that MACI candidates demonstrate their understanding of assessment and its impact on student learning and their teaching. EDUC 504: Effective Classroom Assessment is a required core course for all MACI candidates. The course design of EDUC 504 provides MACI candidates with opportunities for intensive reflection on their own assessment procedures. It also provides indicators for sound assessment for learning as well as assessment of learning, and multiple opportunities to design and revise assessments to improve their design and utility. Students compile and self-assess portfolios that document their growth in assessment use and design over the course of the semester; these portfolios aid practitioners with future assessment design. The spring 2009 class worked together to develop the rubric that will assess their portfolios, and analysis of portfolio ratings occurred at the conclusion of the semester. Results for the spring 2009 semester and the spring 2010 semester indicate that candidates possess high levels of understanding of the use of assessments as learning aids and methods to construct meaningful assessments.

EDUC 580: Action Research Thesis gives MACI candidates the experience of selecting a research topic, collect data, and assess the effectiveness of strategies used in the research area. To date, candidates have explored a vast array of thesis topics including: literacy and the arts, test anxiety reduction, target heart zones for PE students, and gender-differentiated instruction. Candidates indicated in presentations of their research, self-reflections, and surveys that the Action Research Experience provided the opportunity to increase skills and knowledge as professional educators. MACI candidates further indicated that a two-semester approach might allow for more depth in research. Several also suggested increased emphasis on APA writing style in coursework preceding the thesis course.

1d.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' ability to help all students learn? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to the ability to help all students learn could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]

The survey for graduating students in initial licensure programs (undergraduate and MAT) has two questions that directly address the candidate's ability to help all students learn: 4. Creating instructional opportunities for diverse learners, 5. Accessing appropriate service/resources to meet exceptional learning needs. The majority of graduating students (80% of graduates in fall of 2009 and 75% of graduates in spring of 2010) rated their preparation in these areas as either "Exceptional" or "Strong."

The alumni and principals surveys for initial licensure programs have indicators that address graduates' abilities to help all students learn. The alumni survey of graduates from the last five years in initial licensure programs and the principal's evaluation of recent graduates in initial licensure program both include 3 questions that address the candidate's ability to help all students learn. Question 3: "adapt instructional opportunities for diverse learners," Question 6: "differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners," and question 8 "use appropriate evaluation and assessments to determine student mastery of content." Alumni reported feeling well prepared to teach all students. The principals' survey response rate for initial licensure and the MACI programs was too low to formulate conclusions; however, those who responded indicated that graduates are well prepared in these areas.

Graduating MACI candidates complete the survey in EDUC 580. The initial administration of the survey was at the end of the spring 2009 semester. Surveys indicated that these graduates were highly satisfied with the core education courses with the majority of survey items receiving a ranking of Exceptional, Strong, or Sufficient. Only "Preparation to use community or family resources to meet the needs of diverse learners" received a rating of weak (50%) in spring of 2010. This will be discussed in the fall 2010 NCATE retreat and in DOE meetings.

1d.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to student learning may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]
Exhibits 1d:
* Attachment A: Directions for accessing SPA reports through PRS
* Attachment L: MACI Report
* Attachment M Survey of Graduating Candidates (Initial Licensure) with data
* Attachment N Survey of Alumni (Initial Licensure)
* Attachment O Survey of Principals Evaluating Recent graduates (Initial licensure)
* Attachment P Survey of Cooperating Teachers

1e. Knowledge and Skills for Other School Professionals

1e.1. What are the pass rates of other school professionals on licensure tests by program and across all programs (i.e., overall pass rate)? Please complete Table 5 or upload your own table at Prompt 1e.4 below.

Table 5
Pass Rates on Licensure Tests for Other School Professionals
For Period: Shepherd University does not offer programs for Other School Professionals.

PEU Table Five

1e.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from other key assessments indicate that other school professionals demonstrate the knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for programs for other school professionals that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1e.4 below.]

Shepherd University does not offer programs for "Other School Professionals."

1e.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about the knowledge and skills of other school professionals? If survey data are being reported, what was the response rate? [A table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1e.4 below. The attached table could include all of the responses to your follow-up survey to which you could refer the reader in responses on follow-up studies in other elements of Standard 1.]

Shepherd University does not offer programs for "Other School Professionals.

1e.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the knowledge and skills of other school professionals may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

1f. Student Learning for Other School Professionals

1f.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates can create positive environments for student learning, including building on the developmental levels of students; the diversity of students, families, and communities; and the policy contexts within which they work? [Data for programs for other school professionals that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1f.3 below.]

Shepherd University does not offer programs for "Other School Professionals."

1f.2. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' ability to create positive environments for student learning? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to the ability to create positive environments for student leaning could be attached at Prompt 1f.3 below.]

Shepherd University does not offer programs for "Other School Professionals."

1f.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to other school professionals' creation of positive environments for student learning may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

1g. Professional Dispositions for All Candidates. [Indicate when the responses refer to the preparation of initial teacher candidates, advanced teacher candidates, and other school professionals, noting differences when they occur.]

1g.1. What professional dispositions are candidates expected to demonstrate by completion of programs?

Candidates seeking initial licensure (undergraduate and MAT) are expected to demonstrate the dispositions listed in the conceptual framework. These expected dispositions are listed below.

The candidate/practitioner demonstrates the willingness and capacity to

  1. Practice teaching/learning from our model's thematic structure: Action, Interpretation, and Critical Reflection;
  2. Continuously engage in self-analytical and self-reflective processes for professional development;
  3. Engage in critical discourse about education issues;
  4. Respect the individual dignity and diverse learning orientations of all students;
  5. Commit to excellence in academics and practical teaching/learning experiences;
  6. Assume personal responsibility for professional development.
  7. Engage in lifelong learning.

The MACI program builds upon the identified dispositions of the conceptual framework utilizing National Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS). Core Propositions 1 and 4 primarily address dispositions. These include:

Proposition 1: Teachers are Committed to Students and Their Learning
- NBCTs are dedicated to making knowledge accessible to all students. They believe all students can learn.
- They treat students equitably. They recognize the individual differences that distinguish their students from one another and they take account for these differences in their practice.
- They respect the cultural and family differences students bring to their classroom.
- They are concerned with their students' self-concept, their motivation and the effects of learning on peer relationships.

Proposition 4: Teachers Think Systematically about Their Practice and Learn from Experience
- NBCTs model what it means to be an educated person - they read, they question, they create and they are willing to try new things.
- They critically examine their practice on a regular basis to deepen knowledge, expand their repertoire of skills, and incorporate new findings into their practice.

1g.2. How do candidates demonstrate that they are developing professional dispositions related to fairness and the belief that all students can learn? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]

Candidates for initial licensure demonstrate professional dispositions through key assessments within programs and at the unit level. Unit assessments include the Pro-05 qualitative assessment, candidate reflections, and student teaching observation reports. The Pro-05 evaluations are part of the requirements for admission to teacher education and to student teaching. The DOE analyzes data from the Pro-05 evaluations completed in EDUC 150, 320, and 400 to determine if candidates demonstrate growth from beginning the program to exit. The MAT coordinator advises candidates using Pro-05 data to counsel students and to assist in the determination of admission to student teaching. This final evaluation helps determine whether MAT candidates are leaving the program with desired dispositions. Data reported in EDUC 400 reflect the candidate's dispositions exiting the program. Data from 2007-08, 2008-09, and 2009-10 demonstrate that most candidates receive the highest ratings on identified dispositions as they exit the program.

The DOE reviewed the Pro-05 for Initial Licensure Programs in the fall of 2008 to determine whether it addressed all of the dispositions identified in the conceptual framework; in particular, to determine whether the evaluation addressed candidates' disposition in relation to fairness and the belief that all students can learn. The old form did not adequately address this disposition. Three dispositions added to the current Pro-05 address this deficit. Student teaching evaluations assess dispositions, as candidates must create safe learning environments based in mutual respect with high expectations for all students. The DOE created a Pro-05 form for the MACI candidates. It addresses dispositions from the conceptual framework, the NBPTS standards, and the primary strands of the mission statement for the MACI (scholarship, advocacy, leadership, and collaboration). This evaluation helps determine whether the program fosters appropriate dispositions. MACI candidates, as practicing teachers, demonstrate the basic dispositional goals of teaching. Student teaching observation reports by university supervisors indicate that the majority of initial candidates incorporate attention to diversity concerns in teaching as well as display a professional demeanor. See attachments listed below in 1g 5.

1g.3. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates demonstrate the professional dispositions listed in 1.g.1 as they work with students, families, colleagues, and communities? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]

The qualitative evaluation (Pro-05) (Attachment V) is the primary assessment used to evaluate candidate dispositions. In addition, there are several other unit assessments that evaluate dispositions of candidates for initial licensure. These include: the portfolio review completed for Juncture 1 (admission to teacher education) and Juncture 2 (admission to clinical practice), the TWS, and the student teaching evaluations (ST 58- PEPE and ST-76). The juncture portfolio reviews require candidates to reflect on their dispositions and select artifacts to demonstrate that they are developing desired dispositions. Candidates often include reflections and copies of Pro-05s in their portfolios. The candidate's advisor reviews the portfolio, and the candidate cannot apply for juncture until the portfolio is rated at the satisfactory level. The TWS requires candidates to self-examine their teaching to determine how to support student learning effectively (See SPA/CAR reports for TWS data). The TWS assignment requires candidates to write a significant reflection that explores how they adapted instruction to meet the learning needs of all students, how they view their teaching strengths and needs, and what they need to do to improve. The ST 58- PEPE and ST-76 include multiple indicators that address dispositions (See Attachment O for data). For MACI candidates, dispositions are assessed through the completion of the Diversity Field Project (See Attachment S) and the Assessment Portfolio (See Attachment Q) as well as the qualitative evaluation (Pro-05). Candidates demonstrate their ability to assess students equitably, and analyze their perceptions of what diversity needs exist in their classrooms, schools, or district.
The attached table indicates that the Pro-05s show that initial licensure candidates gain appropriate dispositions as they progress through the program with the highest levels earned in EDUC 400 as the candidates exit the program. Candidates' survey results indicate positive growth from when the candidates completed EDUC 150.

1g.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' demonstration of professional dispositions? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to professional dispositions could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]

The results of the survey of cooperating teachers (spring 2010) indicated that 97.5% of teacher candidates demonstrate through actions and words their belief that all children can learn. The response rate for principals was low; however, 85.5% of the responding principals indicated that the graduates believe that all children can learn. Only five principals responded to this survey.

The alumni survey of recent graduates includes multiple questions that address candidate dispositions. Survey results indicate alumni believe that all children can learn and they feel prepared to teach diverse learners.

1g.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to professional dispositions may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]
Links:
Conceptual Framework: http://www.shepherd.edu/eduweb/tarps.html
NBPTS Standards: http://www.nbpts.org/the_standards
WVDE Policy 5100: http://wvde.state.wv.us/policies/p5100.pdf
Exhibits for 1g:
* Attachment A: Directions for accessing SPA reports through PRS
* Attachment L: MACI Report
* Attachment M: Survey of Graduating Candidates (Initial Licensure)
* Attachment N: Survey of Alumni
* Attachment O: Survey of Principals Evaluating Recent Graduates Student
* Attachment P: Survey of Cooperating Teachers
* Attachment R: Student Teaching Evaluations Disaggregated by Program by Year
* Attachment T: ST76 Manual; Data by Year
* Attachment U Teacher Work Sample Guidelines and Rubric and Data
* Attachment V Pro-05 Qualitative Evaluation

Optional

1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 1?
Teacher candidates across all programs pass PRAXIS. Cooperating teachers and principals as well as the candidates themselves report that teacher candidates are well prepared in terms of content knowledge and pedagogy.

 

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