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* Courses that fall under Shepherd University’s Core Curriculum “LS” or Lab Science, which is a Tier One and requires a full 8-credit sequence of the same science.

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CHEM 100 – Chemical Science
(3 cr) This course is designed primarily for future elementary school teachers. It introduces the student to the basic concepts of chemistry including atoms, radioactivity, bonding, chemical equations, solutions, acids and bases, and some aspects of organic and biochemistry. The latter part of the course is devoted to the study of chemical science as it applies to the elementary school: mini lectures, demonstrations, experiments, games, textbook and journal reviews are presented by the students. Circumstances permitting, the course ends with practice teaching at an elementary school Computers are used as aids to instruction and as laboratory tools. The course CHEM 100L must be taken concurrently with this course.

CHEM 100L – Chemical Science Laboratory
(1 cr) The laboratory emphasizes learning by discovery and by student-designed (or modified) experiments. Current or prior enrollment in CHEM 100 is required.

CHEM 101 – Chemistry in Society I *
(3 cr) With CHEM 101L, CHEM 102, and CHEM 102L, satisfies the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Designed for the non-science major, Chemistry in Society is a study of the fundamental facts, laws and principles of inorganic and organic chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the role of chemistry in our culture and everyday life as well as the benefits and costs of chemical technology. Topics to be covered include the scientific method, atomic theory, redox chemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Other topics covered include waste management, food production, population and agribusiness.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for this course.

CHEM 101L – Chemistry in Society Laboratory *
(1 cr each) With CHEM 101, CHEM 102, and CHEM 102L, satisfies the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Chemistry in Society I lab is designed for non-science majors, and includes experiments that demonstrate theories presented in the lecture, CHEM 101. A portion of the course will involve looking outside the lab, in media (print, television, cinema) and discussion of the role of chemistry in our culture and everyday affairs, especially the benefits and costs of chemical technology. Some of the topics to be covered will include the scientific method, and consumer products and advertising. Laboratory topics and sequence integrated with lecture.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for this course.

CHEM 102 – Chemistry in Society II *
(3 cr) With CHEM 101, CHEM 101L, and CHEM 102L, satisfies the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement.  The course involves the study of the fundamental principles of chemistry with particular emphasis on the role of chemistry in our culture and everyday affairs, and the benefits and costs of chemical technology.  Toipcs to be covered include energy production, consumption and resources, natural resources, water and air, biochemistry and  molecular biology, food production, population and agribusiness, consumer products and advertising, chemical, medicines and pharmaceutics, and toxicology and waste management.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for this course.

CHEM 102L – Chemistry in Society Laboratory *
(1 cr each) With CHEM 101, CHEM 101L, and CHEM 102L, satisfies the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement.  Integrated approach to the chemistry of plants, animals, and microorganisms. Half of the course is centered around environmental principles, and the other half is centered around organismic homeostatic (regulatory) principles. Laboratory topics and sequence integrated with lecture.  There are no pre- or co-requisites for this course.

CHEM 120 – College Chemistry *
(3 cr each) CHEM 120 and its companion course CHEM 120L are the first part of a two-semester sequence that presents an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing program. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of chemistry that have connections to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. Topics include measurements and units, nuclear chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, solutions, chemical reactivity, acids and bases, thermochemistry, properties of gases, and an introduction to organic chemistry.  This course, along with CHEM 120L, CHEM 122, and CHEM 122L, fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 120L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 120L – College Chemistry Laboratory *

(1 cr each) CHEM 120L is a laboratory course designed to be taken with CHEM 120.  CHEM 120 and  CHEM 120L are the first part of a two-semester sequence that presents an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing program. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of chemistry that have connections to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. Topics include measurements and units, nuclear chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, solutions, chemical reactivity, acids and bases, thermochemistry, and properties of gases.  This course, along with CHEM 120, CHEM 122, and CHEM 122L, fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 120 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 122 – College Chemistry *
(3 cr each) CHEM 122 and its companion course CHEM 122L are the second part of a two-semester sequence that presents an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing program. The course places special emphasis on those aspects of chemistry that have connections to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. The course begins with an introduction to organic chemistry that will serve as a basis for the study of the biochemically important compounds such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. This course, along with CHEM 120, CHEM 120L, and CHEM 122L, fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 120.   Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 122L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 122L – College Chemistry Laboratory *
(1 cr each) CHEM 122L is a laboratory course designed to be taken with CHEM 122.  CHEM 122 and 122L are the second part of a two-term sequence that presents an overview of fundamental chemical principles for students preparing for a nursing program. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of chemistry that have connections to physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medicine. Topics covered include organic functional groups, reactions of organic and biological compounds, and measurement of biologically important molecules.  This course, along with CHEM 120, CHEM 120L, and CHEM 122, fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 122 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 207 – General Chemistry I *
(3 cr) CHEM 207 and its companion lab, CHEM 207L, are the first part of a two-semester sequence that serves as an introduction to modern chemistry for students majoring in the sciences.  The course provides a basis for, and is a prerequisite for, advanced courses in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology.   Science majors, premedical and other pre-professional students should take this course.  The topics covered include measurements and units, atomic and molecular structure, periodic properties of the elements, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, chemical reactivity, thermochemistry, and the structure and properties of gases, liquids and solids.  This course, along with CHEM 207L, CHEM 209, and CHEM 209L, fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: Background in high school chemistry and algebra. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 207L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 207L – General Chemistry I Laboratory *
(1 cr) CHEM 207L is a laboratory course that is designed to accompany CHEM 207. The course provides a basis for, and is a prerequisite for, advanced courses in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology. Science majors, premedical and other pre-professional students should take this course. The topics covered include measurements and units, basic laboratory techniques, quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, spectrophotometric analysis, gravimetric analysis, stoichiometry, thermochemistry and chromatography. This course, along with CHEM 207, CHEM 209, and CHEM 209L, fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: Background in high school chemistry and algebra. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 207 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 209 – General Chemistry II *
(3 cr) CHEM 209 and its associated lab, CHEM 209L, are the second part of a two-semester sequence that serves as an introduction to modern chemistry for students majoring in the sciences. The course provides a basis for, and is a prerequisite for, advanced courses in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology. Science majors, premedical and other pre-professional students should take this course. The topics covered include equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, solutions and solubility, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, nuclear chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry. This course, along with CHEM 207, CHEM 207L, and CHEM 209L, fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 207. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 209L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 209L – General Chemistry II Laboratory *
(1 cr) CHEM 209L is a laboratory course that is designed to accompany CHEM 209.  The course provides a basis for, and is a prerequisite for, advanced courses in chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology. Science majors, premedical and other pre-professional students should take this course. The topics covered include volumetric analysis, chromatography, spectroscopy, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, colligative properties and organic and inorganic synthesis. This course, along with CHEM 207, CHEM 207L, and CHEM 209, fulfills the Core Curriculum Laboratory Sciences requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 207 and CHEM 207L. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 209 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 301 – Inorganic Chemistry
(3 cr) The theoretical principles of chemical bonding and molecular structure are correlated with the chemical and physical properties of inorganic compounds. Includes covalent and ionic bonding, periodic trends, systematic study of the representative, transition, inner-transition and inert gas elements, structure determination, and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: CHEM 207, CHEM 209.

CHEM 308 – Radiochemistry
(3 cr) A study of the principles underlying the nature of radioactivity and of the various chemical, biological, and industrial applications of radioisotopes. Particular emphasis is placed on stellar nucleosynthesis, fission, fusion, reactor design, accelerators, and theories of the nucleus. Prerequisites: CHEM 207, CHEM 209.

CHEM 311 – Chemical Pharmacology
(3 cr) This course is an introduction to the structure, mechanisms of action, and clinical application of drugs currently in use. The emphasis is on general pharmacological principles and on a survey of a wide spectrum of agents; chemical aspects of pharmacology are stressed where they contribute significantly to the understanding of drug action. Prerequisites: One semester of anatomy/physiology and one semester of chemistry; or, permission of the instructor.

CHEM 315 – Organic Chemistry
(3 cr) This course introduces the fundamental concepts of structure and reactivity of organic compounds. Topics covered include the chemistry of alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, and other functional groups. Reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy of organic compounds are emphasized.  Previously titled Organic Chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 209. Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required, that CHEM 315L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 315L – Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
(1 cr) This course introduces organic synthesis, mechanistic studies, molecular modeling, and modern techniques for the separation and characterization of organic compounds. TLC, GC-MS, IR, NMR, distillation, and polarimetry are emphasized. Prerequisites: CHEM 207L and CHEM 209L. Prerequisite/corequisite: Current or prior enrollment in CHEM 315 is required.

CHEM 316 – Organic Chemistry
(3 cr) This course is a continuation of the topics introduced in CHEM 315, with a focus on alkynes, aromatic compounds, and compounds with oxygen-based functional groups. This course focuses on and emphasizes understanding the reaction mechanisms these molecules undergo during synthetic reactions. Previously titled Organic Chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 315. Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required that CHEM 316L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 316L – Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
(1 cr) This course continues exploring routes of organic synthesis, mechanistic studies, molecular modeling, and modern techniques for the separation and characterization of organic compounds. Distillation, GC-MS, IR, and NMR studies are expanded. Prerequisites:CHEM 315 and CHEM 315L. Prerequisite/corequisite: Current or prior enrollment in CHEM 316 is required.

CHEM 321 – Analytical Chemistry
(3 cr) CHEM 321 covers the theoretical background and practical problem solving skills needed for quantitative chemical analyses. Volumetric, gravimetric, and potentiometric techniques are covered in detail. Chromatography and spectroscopy are covered at an introductory level. Also covered are chemical equilibrium, acid-base theory, and the statistical methods needed for the critical evaluation of data. Prerequisites: CHEM 209. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 321L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 321L – Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
(1 cr) CHEM 321L covers the techniques for volumetric, gravimetric, potentiometric, chromatographic, and spectroscopic analyses. Particular attention is given to data analysis and critical evaluation of data. Students are introduced to, and are expected to use, advanced data handling and error treatment methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 209 and CHEM 209L. Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required, that CHEM 321 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 322 – Instrumental Analysis
(3 cr) CHEM 322 covers both the theoretical and the practical aspects of modern chemical instrumental techniques. Most important types of analytical methods are covered,  including atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, chromatography, electrophoresis, electrochemistry, and surface analysis. Special emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of spectroscopy, chromatography and electrochemistry. Instrument design, sample preparation methods, precision, detection limits, selectivity, and sensitivity are examined for each technique. Specific applications are discussed for chemical, biochemical, and environmental analyses. Prerequisites: CHEM 321. Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required, that CHEM 322L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 322L – Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
(1 cr) CHEM 322L is laboratory course that provides hands-on experience with modern analytical instrumentation and techniques. Students will learn how to prepare samples and how to optimize instrument parameters for several types of instrumentation. Techniques covered include atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, electrochemistry, mass spectroscopy, and chromatography. Students are expected to use advanced data handling and error treatment methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 321. Corequisite: It is strongly recommended, but not required, that CHEM 322 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 325 – Computers in Science
(3 cr) In CHEM 325 common computer programs are used for data analysis, problem solving, and data presentation. Spreadsheets for the analysis of many different types of scientific data are developed. Spreadsheet functions are used to apply several statistical methods including confidence intervals, t-tests, F-tests, single factor ANOVA, histograms, and linear regression. Other topics covered include calibrations curves, determination of quantities from slopes and intercepts, testing models, solving single and multivariable equations, and user defined functions. The preparation of effective scientific plots and scientific presentations is covered in detail. Prerequisites: CHEM 207

CHEM 327 – Solution Chemistry
(3 cr) A one-semester course to be taken by the student in the sophomore or junior year. A study of the physical and chemical properties of the liquid state is pursued, with particular emphasis placed on aqueous solution. The preparation of solutions of various concentrations is reviewed. Thermodynamics is introduced. Other major areas are kinetics, equilibria between phases and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 207, CHEM 209, MATH 105.

CHEM 327L – Solution Chemistry Laboratory
(1 cr) A three-hour per week laboratory course to be taken with Solution Chemistry CHEM 327. Aqueous and nonaqueous solutions will be prepared and their physical and chemical properties will be investigated. Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 327.

CHEM 329 – Biochemistry I
(3 cr) Biochemical structure and function with initial emphasis placed on the properties of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins and the relationship between structure and function. The special role of these biomolecules in the structure and function of biological membranes is then presented. This is followed by an introduction to enzymes and the mechanisms of enzyme action. Attention is then given to the nucleic acids and includes the genetic role, structure, and replication of DNA and the role of RNA in protein synthesis. Prerequisites: CHEM 315 and BIOL 305.

CHEM 329L – Biochemistry I Laboratory
(1 cr) A three-hour per week laboratory course to be taken with CHEM 329 – Biochemistry I. The course will comprise an overview and application of techniques associated with biochemical research, data gathering, and analysis. The students will be introduced to various computer-based methodologies of data analysis molecular modelling and presentation. In addition, the course will involve development of experimental design, reproducible lab techniques, and record keeping. Prerequisite/corequisite: CHEM 329.

CHEM 330 – Biochemistry II
(3 cr) Basic concepts of metabolism with initial emphasis placed on the broad aspects of metabolism and includes a discussion of the energy requirements for reactions in living systems. The degradation of carbohydrates and the biochemical role of glycolysis, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and related pathways are then presented. This is followed by an examination of fatty acid metabolism, nucleotide biochemistry, and selected topics in biosynthesis. Attention is then given to mechanisms of hormone action, transport across biological membranes, and related membrane activity. Prerequisites: CHEM 329.

CHEM 330L – Biochemistry II Laboratory
(1 cr) A second three-hours per week laboratory to be taken with CHEM 330 Biochemistry II. The course involves the application of techniques developed in CHEM 329L to problems associated with characterization of carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids. Included in the experiments performed is the development of purification techniques, enzyme kinetics, and spectroscopic analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 329 and CHEM 329L.

CHEM 331 – Seminar
(1 cr) This course may be taken more than once for credit. The selection, organization, and presentation of topics within one’s area of interest in chemistry. Topics are selected from among the current literature, review articles, and reports in scientific journals. Prerequisites: CHEM 207, CHEM 209.

CHEM 332 – Seminar
(1 cr) This course may be taken more than once for credit. The selection, organization, and presentation of topics within one’s area of interest in chemistry. Topics are selected from among the current literature, review articles, and reports in scientific journals. Prerequisites: CHEM 207, CHEM 209.

CHEM 333 – Environmental Chemistry
(3 cr) CHEM 333 is a course for students interested in the chemical aspects of the environment. This course is intended for chemistry, environmental science and biology majors. Environmental Chemistry is a one-semester survey course that includes many topics. These include studies of the chemistry of the upper and lower atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, the chemistry of ground and surface water, energy use and its consequences, important organic and inorganic environmental toxins, and waste management. Prerequisites:CHEM 209. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 333L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 333L – Environmental Chemistry Lab
(1 cr) CHEM 333L is a one-credit laboratory course covering analytical techniques important to environmental testing. Particular emphasis is placed on methods for water and soil analysis. Volumetric, electrochemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques are covered. Students learn how to prepare samples and how to make accurate and precise measurements. Particular attention is given to data analysis and evaluation of data. Prerequisites: CHEM 209L. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 333 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 340 – Physical Chemistry I
(3 cr) CHEM 340 examines chemical phenomena from fundamental physical principles. It provides the foundation and essentials of thermodynamics and kinetics. Topics include the first and second laws of thermodynamics, solution properties, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 209 or PHYS 202 or PHYS 222. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 340L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 340L – Physical Chemistry I Laboratory
(1 cr) CHEM 340L is a laboratory course designed to accompany CHEM 340. Topics include thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 340 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 350 – Forensic Chemistry
(3 cr) Forensic chemistry is a course for students interested in the hard-sciences underlying forensic investigations. This course is suited for chemistry or biology majors. Forensic chemistry is a one-semester survey course that includes many topics. These topics include studies of drugs of abuse, forensic instrumentation, forensic laboratory analysis, and many others. A special aspect of the course is case scenarios and discussions based on the outcome of real-life investigations. Prerequisites: CHEM 315.

CHEM 392 – Cooperative Education in Chemistry
(1-9 cr) Cooperative education is a form of education which integrates classroom study with paid, planned, and supervised work experiences in the public and privates sectors. Cooperative education allows students to acquire essential, practical skills by being exposed to the reality of the work world beyond the boundaries of campus, enhancing their self-confidence and career direction. An agreement is signed by the employer supervisor, the faculty supervisor, and the student. The co-op may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; minimum 2.3 GPA, 2.5 major GPA; approval of the Department of Chemistry; placement by the Career Center.

CHEM 415 – Advanced Organic Chemistry
(1-3 cr each) The content of the course is flexible and can be structured to meet the needs of the student. Possible orientations include: 1) a review and extension of the principles covered in Organic Chemistry, 2) a detailed treatment of the mechanisms of organic reactions, 3) a selective study of the synthesis of organic compounds, and 4) molecular orbital theory and rate processes as applied to organic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 315, CHEM 316.

CHEM 416 – Advanced Organic Chemistry
(1-3 cr each) The content of the course is flexible and can be structured to meet the needs of the student. Possible orientations include: 1) a review and extension of the principles covered in Organic Chemistry, 2) a detailed treatment of the mechanisms of organic reactions, 3) a selective study of the synthesis of organic compounds, and 4) molecular orbital theory and rate processes as applied to organic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 315, CHEM 316.

CHEM 427 – Spectroscopy
(3 cr) A study of the classical and quantum theories of the interaction of radiation with matter, including an introduction to the Schrodinger wave equation. The absorption and emission of radiation by atoms and molecules are treated, with particular emphasis being placed on ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectroscopy and resonance phenomena. Prerequisites: CHEM 207, CHEM 209, PHYS 201, PHYS 202 and math through calculus.

CHEM 427L – Advanced Physical Chemistry Lab
(1 cr) A three hour per week laboratory course that covers advanced physical chemical laboratory methods. Techniques covered include spectroscopy (infrared, NMR UV-visible absorption), surface chemistry and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 327 and CHEM 327L. Corequisite: CHEM 427 or should be taken concurrently.

CHEM 428 – Thermodynamics
(2 cr) A study of the principles underlying the content and transfer of energy in physical and chemical reactions. The classical laws of thermodynamics are introduced, and the concepts of free energy, entropy, work, and enthalpy are defined and subjected to a careful quantitative treatment. Prerequisites: CHEM 207, CHEM 209, PHYS 201, PHYS 202 and math through calculus.

CHEM 436 – Advanced Protein Chemistry
(3 cr) The course is designed as a combination lecture, recitation and computer modeling components.The material to be covered will be an in-depth review of the structure and function relationships of proteins. Computer modeling, structure analysis and review of the current primary research literature will be used. The course is divided into four major topics of discussion: Part 1, a review of proteomics as it relates to the interrelationship of the different levels of protein structure; Part 2, folding patterns, analysis and prediction of structure; Part 3, specific topics in enzymology and protein chemistry; and Part 4, analysis of protein function by protein engineering and biophysical methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 329.

CHEM 440 – Physical Chemistry II
(3 cr) CHEM 440 examines chemical phenomena from fundamental physical principles. It is devoted to the structure of matter with emphasis on quantum chemistry. Topics include quantum mechanical principles, applications in translational, vibrational and rotational motions, atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: MATH 208 or CHEM 209 or PHYS 202 or PHYS 222. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 440L be taken concurrently.

CHEM 440 – Physical Chemistry II Laboratory
(1 cr) CHEM 440L is a laboratory course that covers more advanced physical chemistry laboratory methods. Topics include advanced calorimetry, spectroscopy, surface chemistry and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 209L. Corequisite: It is recommended, but not required, that CHEM 440 be taken concurrently.

CHEM 450 – Research in Chemistry
(1-3 cr) This course involves the student in research in chemistry. CHEM 392 Cooperative Education in Chemistry may be substituted for CHEM 450. The course is given for 1-3 credits per semester and may be taken repeatedly.

* Courses that fall under Shepherd University’s Core Curriculum “LS” or Lab Science, which is a Tier One and requires a full 8-credit sequence of the same science.